Where Spirit and Action Meet

  • ABC Home 888 W Broadway New York, NY, 10012 United States

This is event is full with a waiting list.  We will post the video of the evening on our facebook page within a week of the event.

Continuing the Legacy of Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Arthel Neville, Fox News Anchor, will lead a discussion with:
~ Alycee J. Lane, author of Nonviolence Now!
~ Sister Peace, Buddhist nun, Thich Nhat Hanh’s Plum Village
~ Marisela Gomez, MD, PhD, community activist and author of Race, Class, Power and Organizing in East Baltimore
Zenju Earthlyn Manuel, PhD, ordained Zen Buddhist priest and author of The Way of Tenderness: Awakening Through Race, Sexuality, and Gender

to discuss the inter-being of spirituality and action in the struggle for racial justice. Given the tragic events in Baltimore, New York, Charleston, Ferguson and elsewhere in the US, the time is now to look deeply and act compassionately to address our country's deep-rooted habit of structural racism.

Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh’s message of peace was instrumental in Dr. King's decision to speak out against the Vietnam War and to nominate Thich Nhat Hanh for the Nobel Peace Prize in 1967. When Dr. King was assassinated, Thich Nhat Hanh vowed to redouble his efforts to build the Beloved Community they had discussed together and to continue teaching the importance of "being peace" in the non-violent struggle for peace and justice.

Their message is as important today as it was 50 years ago.  Explore ways that people are using these teachings today and learn how you can, too.

Doors open at 6:30 and the program starts at 7pm.

A breathing room
deepak homebase, on the mezz at abc home
888 Broadway, New York, NY 10003 | 212.473.3000

Register for this free event

For more information - nyc2015ustour@bluecliffmonastery.org


This event is part of the Miracle of Mindfulness Tour 2015, marking the 40th anniversary of the publication of Thich Nhat Hanh’s pioneering first book, The Miracle of Mindfulness, which first introduced mindfulness to a broad audience in the West.